Senseis Groucho and Chico.jpg
Sensei CHICO and Sensei GROUCHO discussing the new SGI-USA Leadership Manual, Code of Conduct, and Mandatory Signature Form.
GROUCHO: All right, fine. Now here are the contracts. You just put his name at the top and you sign at the bottom. There’s no need of you reading that because these are duplicates.
CHICO: Yeah, they’s a duplicates.
GROUCHO: I say they’re duplicates.
CHICO: Why sure they’s a duplicates…
GROUCHO: Don’t you know what duplicates are?
CHICO: Sure. There’s five kids up in Canada.
GROUCHO: Well, I wouldn’t know about that. I haven’t been to Canada in years. Well go ahead and read it.
CHICO: What does it say?
GROUCHO: Well, go on and read it!
CHICO: You read it.
GROUCHO: All right, I’ll read it to ya. Can you hear?
CHICO: I haven’t heard anything yet. Did you say anything?
GROUCHO: Well, I haven’t said anything worth hearing.
CHICO: Well, that’s why I didn’t hear anything.
GROUCHO: Well, that’s why I didn’t say anything.
CHICO: Can you read?
GROUCHO (struggling to read the fine print): I can read but I can’t see it. I don’t seem to have it in focus here. If my arms were a little longer, I could read it. You haven’t got a baboon in your pocket, have ya? Here, here, here we are. Now I’ve got it. Now pay particular attention to this first clause because it’s most important. It says the, uh, “The party of the first part shall be known in this contract as the party of the first part.” How do you like that? That’s pretty neat, eh?
CHICO: No, it’s no good.
GROUCHO: What’s the matter with it?
CHICO: I don’t know. Let’s hear it again.
GROUCHO: It says the, uh, “The party of the first part shall be known in this contract as the party of the first part.”
CHICO: (pausing) That sounds a little better this time.
GROUCHO: Well, it grows on ya. Would you like to hear it once more?
CHICO: Uh, just the first part.
GROUCHO: What do you mean? The party of the first part?
CHICO: No, the first part of the party of the first part.
GROUCHO: All right. It says the, uh, “The first part of the party of the first part shall be known in this contract as the first part of the party of the first part shall be known in this contract” – look, why should we quarrel about a thing like this? We’ll take it right out, eh?
CHICO: Yeah, it’s a too long, anyhow. (They both tear off the tops of their contracts.) Now, what do we got left?
GROUCHO: Well, I got about a foot and a half. Now, it says, uh, “The party of the second part shall be known in this contract as the party of the second part.”
CHICO: Well, I don’t know about that…
GROUCHO: Now what’s the matter?
CHICO: I no like-a the second party, either.
GROUCHO: Well, you should’ve come to the first party. We didn’t get home ’til around four in the morning… I was blind for three days!
CHICO: Hey, look, why can’ta the first part of the second party be the second part of the first party? Then a you gotta something.
GROUCHO: Well, look, uh, rather than go through all that again, what do you say?
CHICO: Fine. (They rip out a portion of the contract.)
GROUCHO: Now, uh, now I’ve got something you’re bound to like. You’ll be crazy about it.
CHICO: No, I don’t like it.
GROUCHO: You don’t like what?
CHICO: Whatever it is. I don’t like it.
GROUCHO: Well, don’t let’s break up an old friendship over a thing like that. Ready?…
CHICO: OK! (Another part is torn off.) Now the next part, I don’t think you’re gonna like.
GROUCHO: Well, your word’s good enough for me. (They rip out another part.) Now then, is my word good enough for you?
CHICO: I should say not.
GROUCHO: Well, that takes out two more clauses. (They rip out two more parts.) Now, “The party of the eighth part…”
CHICO: No, that’sa no good. (more ripping.) No.
GROUCHO: “The party of the ninth part…”
CHICO: No, that’sa no good, too. (they rip the contracts again until there’s practically nothing left.) Hey, how is it my contract is skinnier than yours?
GROUCHO: Well, I don’t know. You must’ve been out on a tear last night. But anyhow we’re all set now, aren’t we?
CHICO: Oh sure.
GROUCHO (offering his pen to sign the contract): Now just, uh, just you put your name right down there and then the deal is, uh, legal.
CHICO: I forgot to tell you. I can’t write.
GROUCHO: Well, that’s all right, there’s no ink in the pen anyhow. But listen, it’s a contract, isn’t it?
CHICO: Oh sure.
GROUCHO: We got a contract…
CHICO: You bet.
GROUCHO: No matter how small it is…
CHICO: Hey, wait, wait. What does this say here? This thing here.
GROUCHO: Oh, that? Oh, that’s the usual clause. That’s in every contract. That just says uh, it says uh, “If any of the parties participating in this contract is shown not to be in their right mind, the entire agreement is automatically nullified.”
CHICO: Well, I don’t know…
GROUCHO: It’s all right, that’s, that’s in every contract. That’s, that’s what they call a ‘sanity clause’.
CHICO: Ha ha ha ha ha! You can’t fool me! There ain’t no Sanity Clause!

We usually refer to Myo as “mystic” as in The Mystic Law. One explanation of the word “mystic” from an English dictionary describes it as this: a person who seeks by contemplation and self surrender to obtain unity with or absorption into the Deity or the absolute, or who believes in the spiritual apprehension of truths that are beyond the intellect. And the explanation of “mystical” is: transcending human understanding. Therefore, “mystic”, by this definition, is the personification of that which is “mystical”. So it would seem that when we Nichiren Buddhists refer to the “mystic law” we are referring to the personification of that which is transcendental to our understanding but is becoming integrated into our very person. But is that actually what we believe? When we refer to the “mystic” law we really think in terms of the “mystical” law, something that is apart from ourselves. And we don’t think of ourselves as “mystics”. Why is that? Is it because this law can only be understood between Buddhas and we don’t think of ourselves as one? Perhaps.

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Since this is my first entry on a blog which is now losing it’s credibility by allowing me to contribute, I’m going to start with something not too controversial before I jump into the deep poo abyss.
Pleonasm
1a. The use of more words than are required to express an idea; redundancy.
There are many simple examples of this kind of wording redundancy. The most famous might be from The Firesign Theater “The Department Of Redundancy Department”. Others are armed gunmen, fall down, plan ahead, free gift, ATM machine (automatic teller machine machine) or juzu beads (prayer beads beads). My personal new favorite is “Prince, the artist formerly known as, ‘The Artist Formerly Known As Prince’”. The list is an endless list.
Here’s one that pops into my head when I do morning gongyo:
“I suppose you know what your doing, but I wonder if you realize what this means?”
(Claude Rains as Monsieur Renault the Prefect of Police to Humphrey Bogart as Rick Blaine in the movie classic “Casablanca”.)

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