On Nichiren’s Gohonzon for Practicing Kanjin
The Ita-Dai-Go-Honzon Issue
The Gain & Loss, Benefit & Punishment, or Blessing & Curse Inscriptions

Links alleged to images of an authorized 1910 photo of the Taisekiji Daigohonzon: DG1 DG2 w/ simulated gold lettering

Another bone of contention, often raised in Independent circles, is the alleged presence of the Blessing/Curse inscriptions on the Taisekiji Gohonzon{s}. These do appear on transcriptions of Great Mandalas from Taisekiji, such as the SGI Nichikan, the Nittatsu, and the Nikken. They are located in the top row, on either side of the Daimoku, outside of {flanking}, the two Buddhas and four Bodhisattvas. These are also often said to appear on the Camphor Wood Yashiro Kunishige Dai-Mandara, aka Taisekiji Daigohonzon, aka Ita Mandala.
But are they even really there on the Camphor Wood Yashiro Kunishige Dai-Mandara, aka Taisekiji Daigohonzon, aka Ita Mandala?
And what is an arjaka branch?
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From the Dharani chapter [26] of The Lotus Sutra:
If there are those who fail to heed our spells
and trouble and disrupt the preachers of the Law,
their heads will split into seven pieces
like the branches of the arjaka.

Note that if one touches the Arjaka or Basil shrub, the blossom falls off with its branch and breaks apart.}
From: Sokashoshu.com Nichiren Shoshu’s Honzons {A Kempon Hokke Hogwash Hit Piece}
On all the Gohonzons issued by Taisekiji and SGI, we find:
1) Facing it, on the upper right-hand side, a phrase “Jiyaku-Nou-ran-sha, Zu-ha-shichi-bu”, [which] means that to those slander will have their head broken in seven places.
2)Facing it, on the upper left-hand side, a phrase “Yuu-ku-you-sha fuku-ka-juugo”, [which] means that to those who worship, 100% benefit. None of the known gohonzons inscribed by Nichiren has those phrases. Even the five
gohonzons inscribed by Nikko at Hon-mon-ji do not have these phrases.
These phrases only appear in Gosho’s p.869 “Haku-roko-sho” (Kechimyaku-sho) which means that this part of the Gosho is also a fake.

Also: Insofar as can be ascertained from the one circulated photograph of the so-called “dai- gohonzon” (taken in 1910, with permission of Taisekiji), phrases has been added to the body of the honzon. Such phrases never appeared in any other Nichiren gohonzon, and are incongruous with the nature of the gohonzon. (These are the phrases referring to “gain” and “loss”, on either side of the SGI/NST honzons).Let’s recap … the so-called dai-gohonzon
Their contention was that the presence of these phrases proved that Nichiren could not have inscribed it. That does not seem to be the case at all.
And according to Reginald Carpenter: “those two (2) so called “Blessing/ Curse inscriptions” are really NOT present on the so called “Yashiro Memorial Daimandara”, aka. Taiseki-ji Dai-Gohonzon, aka. Ita Mandala,” which is commonly & correctly called the Dai-Gohonzon!”
He adds, “Nichiren Daishonin … gave & left the instructions for putting/ transcribing those two (2) terms on the Gohonzon in a passage from “Seven Articles on Transmission of the Gohonzon” that was published in the “Nichiren Shoshu Seiten” (page #379) by the 65th High Priest of Nichiren Shoshu in 1952! ”
The reader can view the photo. I have, and do not think the two phrases are there. Here are two enhanced versions of the 1910 image, hosted @ Photobucket [Caution: These are alleged to be images of an authorized photo of the Taisekiji Daigohonzon.]:
DG1
DG2 w/ simulated gold lettering
These are definitely on transcriptions of Great Mandalas from Taisekiji, such as the SGI Nichikan, the Nittatsu, and the Nikken. The inscriptions are located in the top row, on either side of the Daimoku, outside of, or flanking, the two Buddhas and four Bodhisattvas:
Left side, facing: “U kuyo sha fuku ka jugo” or “ukuyosha fukuka jugo”.
“Those who make offerings will gain good fortune surpassing the ten honorable titles.” or
“Those who make offerings [to the Lotus Sutra] will reap fortune exceeding the ten honorable titles.”
Right side facing: “Nyaku noran sha zu ha shichibun” or “nyaku noransha zuha shichibun”.
“Those who vex and trouble [the practitioners of the Law] will have their heads split into seven pieces.” or:
“If there are those who cause trouble and disruption, their heads will be split into seven pieces.”
The phrases themselves are indirectly from the Lotus Sutra and are based on the Curse of Kishimonjin and the Jurasetsunyo, from the Dharani Chaper. According to “Stoney” the direct source is the Hokke Mongu Ki”, Or “Annotations on the Hokke Mongu” by Tiantai Patriarch Mialo. And, actually, I think the concept goes back to the Buddha’s debates with Brahmins.
From May 23, 2005
Revised & Updated 01-17-2006
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August 19, 2005
The Gain/Loss aka Blessing/Curse Entries

From about 1278 to his passing, Nichiren inscribed quite a few Dai-Mandaras. These are all rather similar in pattern.
Wheras many earlier mandalas had four entries flanking the central Daimoku on either side, all of the later Dai Mandara{s}, at least those that are published, have only three.
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Look at the first diagram. Do you see all 4 Bodhisattvas? Do you also see the 4 Buddhas? There is an extra Buddha on each side. Total of 4 entries on each side, or 8 in all. There are 4 Buddhas & 4 Bodhisattvas. The 2 extra Buddhas are Jippo Bunshin and Zentoku Nyorai.
The two extra Buddhas, between the two Buddhas, Shaka and Taho, and the Four Bodhisattvas, on the early one {1274}, are representives of various emanation Buddhas of Shakyamuni. These are not present on the later Dai Mandara from 1280. Look at the second diagram. There is only 1 Buddha and 2-bosatsu on each side. There are three entries on each side, or 6 in all. There are 2 Buddhas, Shaka & Taho, & 4 Bodhisattvas.
There are four entries in the top row on some Fuji School transcriptions. The oldest of these I have seen published was inscribed by Nikko in 1308. I have seen published transcriptions by Nichidai & Nichimyo from Kitayama & Nishiyama that appear to have them as well.
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Finally, look at third. There is only 1 Buddha and 2-bosatsu on each side. There are 2 Buddhas & 4 Bodhisattvas. But there is a 4th entry on each side. These are blessing & curse phrases from the Lotus Sutra.
*U kuyo sha fuku ka jugo-Those who make offerings will gain good fortune surpassing the ten honorable titles [of the Buddha.]
*Nyaku noran sha zu ha shichibun-Those who vex and trouble [the practitioners of the Dharma] will have their heads split into seven pieces.
These do appear to be on at least four authenticated and published Nichiren Mandalas. They also appear to be on 4 published early transcriptions from the Kitayama & Nishiyama Temples. These blessing/curse inscriptions from the Lotus Sutra are said to appear on the Great Mandala of Taisekiji, and are also on the transcriptions issued to SGI & Hokkeko members. Note that the Taisekiji Great Mandala is not published, nor are any Nichiren Shoshu transcriptions. My understanding is that Nichiren Shoshu forbids this.
While Nichiren Shu has some Nichiren Mandalas & Amulets they decline to publish, they do not have a blanket proscription. Nor is this proscribed by any other Shu I know of. There are Mandalas from the other Nikko-Fuji School Shu{s} that are lawfully published and in the public domain.
I have personally decided not to post pictures of Nichiren Shoshu Mandalas at public web sites. I wanted to mention that since SGI & Hokkeko members are likely present. That is my present policy. If I post links to locations with pictures of the Yashiro Kunishige Dai-Mandara Great Mandala of Taisekiji, or the Nittatsu, Nikken, or Nichikan transcriptions, I shall try to be mindful & warn of this.
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